SURVIVING ECZEMA

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NOVEMBER 3, 2018 BETTY BEKHAM

She was in the playground with her fellow classmates when one of them shouted, why have you applied blueband on your face? She touched her face oblivious of what would follow. By this time all the other children were staring at her for a response. She was just about to turn 10 years. They were playing with sand and another girl offered to check the face but couldn’t see anything. When bus arrived and she ran as fast as she could leaving the others behind and sat in a corner where no one could see or talk to her.

When she arrived at home from school, she started crying accusing her classmates and saying she won’t go back to school. Her parents consoled her.

The following morning she was sober, went to school full of energy like nothing had happened yesterday. Her fellow classmates had also forgotten to ask of her progress. By evening she started scratching her face. Tried to wash her face with the school tap water but it was in vain. She explained the situation that evening to her parents and was taken to hospital the following morning.

The doctor examined her and explained that she had a skin disease called ezcema, which looked like a ringworm. That word was too big for the little girl to pronounce. She was given some tablets to swallow and some ointment.

After 6 months there were no changes and it became a habit of going back to hospital, change of medicines and doctors too. The first doctor was a dermatologist.

After two years, she was taken to a pediatrician. He too knew of skin conditions in particular which mostly affects children. He explained that this condition was brought about by sun rays and the solid oil applied on her face. The reaction was what caused the patches which were becoming yellow,red and itchy. The explanation was easy for the girl to understand and her file was written in bold ‘EZCEMA ‘. He gave her some different ointments and an injection. The back and forth continued.

When she became a teenager and acne was now on her forehead she had to be prescribed for an ointment that would dry her pimples and another for the ezcema. Here the doctor was keen to note that when she turned 16 years the ezcema would disappear.

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HER DREAM OF BECOMING A MOGUL MODEL AND A BEAUTY QUEEN WAS SHUTTERED. SHE DIDN’T LIKE PHOTOGRAPHS. CHECKING HERSELF ON THE MIRROR TOO BECAME A HARD TASK. SHE HAD NO IDEA OF HOW MAKE UP WOULD LOOK ON HER. HER SELF ESTEEM WAS LOW. SHE TRIED ALOE VERA SOAP BUT WITH NO SUCCESS. SHE ALSO TRIED THE FRESH ALOE VERA HERB BUT ITCHED HER TO A POINT THE SKIN STARTED PEELING.

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This hope grew but when she turned 16 years, the patterns changed. From September to March the patches would enlarge at the eyes, ears and at the tip of the nose. April to August the patches would be small.

She was now a big girl who could take herself to the hospital. She went very frustrated and the doctor would still tell her, “When you turn 18 the patches will disappear. ” She was told to continue with the previous ointment.

After finishing high school she went back to the pediatrician. He recommended another ointment and was given an appointment of going back after 8 months. The patches had disappeared on the nose and ears. The doctor was quite pleased with the progress. He banned her from using solid oils on the face and sunscreens. The patches were scaly and peeling off. She was told to apply some on her face to avoid the itching and redness.

The doctor had 3 Masters’ Certificates hanged on the wall which caught her attention and asked about it. He told her that hard work, determination and the zeal to change people’s lives is what made him to continue studying.

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She went for the appointment when she was 18 and this she hoped would be her last visit. She was emotionally exhausted as people would keep tell her of how she had ringworms and ask why she didn’t visit the doctor. It was hard to explain to each and every person of her struggles.

The doctor would again tell get that by the time she turns twenty two years, the patches would disappear. It affected her even more. She thought it would never end.

The doctor had to explain once again. Ezcema healing is a process not a one-day affair. You have to be patient and follow the instructions. If you don’t then it will reccur. He recommended a cream that would help her in the transition.

It was called Aqeous Cream. It reduced irritation and softened the affected areas. Since the patches had started to disappear slowly by slowly, it therefore acted as a moisturizer.

Facial ezcema can be a confidence killer and emotionally exhausting. It can be managed and healed at the same time depending on which type of ezcema.

Published by depatridge

Serving humanity dispassionately, whatever the cost.

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