Using Digital Tools to Build a Learning Culture

Virtual Learning

Virtual Learning - Using Digital Tools to Build a Learning Culture

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Build a culture of learning with digital tools.

Learning is a key factor in any company’s success. In rapidly changing, highly competitive times, we all need to have up-to-date knowledge and skills – plus opportunities to keep adding more.

And organizations need strategies to support effective learning, so that they’re ready for every new challenge.

One important part of this is choosing the right tools. And whether you’re looking to improve your own learning, or exploring better ways to provide learning for others, there are many options to choose from. These include e-learning providers, online courses, MOOCs – even virtual reality!

Investing in Learning

Technology has transformed the world of work. Unsurprisingly, many organizations have also turned to technology in a bid to keep up and stay competitive.

Digital tools can deliver learning flexibly, at a distance, and on a large scale. They can offer rich, up-to-date learning experiences that are tailored to different people’s needs and aligned with an organization’s strategic plans. Since 2010, their use has more than doubled.

However, these strategies don’t always work as well as they should. OECD, ILO, World Bank, and other institutions have highlighted an urgent need for employers to upskill their current workforce, if they’re to survive and remain relevant. And a recent McKinsey Global Survey reported that 87 percent of executives were either experiencing skill gaps now, or expecting to see them in the next few years. [1]

So learning technologies alone aren’t enough to keep pace with change. As well as being chosen and used with care, these tools need to be integrated into a wider culture of learning.

What Is Virtual Learning?

“Virtual learning” uses technology to improve the learning process, rather than relying solely on a face-to-face, teacher-pupil approach.

At its most basic level, it might involve people taking part in a lesson remotely – often called distance education. This can be useful if you want all of your learners to hear the same message at the same time, and to be able to interact with the teacher and one another.

But technology also allows people to choose what they learn, how they want to learn, and when they want to learn – this self-determined learning enables learners to make choices about their own development.

Technology can also add different elements to the learning process, such as audio and video. It can improve learning engagement – with other learners, experts, and the material itself – through communication tools, interactive exercises, or even immersive technologies such as virtual reality.

Virtual learning can provide individuals with carefully tailored learning opportunities that are effective and enjoyable. It can benefit learners as individuals, and also support their organizations to achieve their overall learning and development goals.

How The Best Leaders Overcome Their Own Defense Mechanisms

By Lolly Daskal

Defense mechanisms—the unconscious reactions that protect us from anxiety and internal conflict—are a part of being human. We all have them. And while they frequently do harm, in some situations they can actually be useful. What matters, in life and in leadership, is what we do about them.

Failing to understand and deal with your defense mechanisms is especially harmful in leadership work, where relationships with others are critically important and you’re setting the standard for the workplace culture of your entire team.

Defense mechanisms work differently for everybody. But whatever form they take, it’s possible to master defensive responses and damaging habits—to harness them in a way that helps you rather than holding you back.

Here are the top ideas I share with my executive leadership coaching clients for overcoming their own defense mechanisms:

Cultivate self-awareness. The necessary first stop is to understand how you use defense mechanisms when you’re feeling vulnerable. Think about what situations tend to trigger defense responses and how you typically respond. Consider the ways that your behavior may be harming you and those around you, and imagine other ways to respond to situations that seem threatening.

Make room for acceptance. When you feel yourself moving toward a defensive response, stop and give yourself a brief time out. Spend a few moments giving space to what you’re thinking and feeling. Identify those thoughts and feelings and work to accept them without judgment. From there you can focus on a healthy response.

Hold yourself accountable. Defense mechanisms are often a way of making excuses or blaming others for things we cannot be responsible for. Remind yourself often that you can’t control anybody else’s actions or responses—but you can control your own. Then spend some time every day reflecting on your own actions and whether they were effective, reasonable, and in line with your values and goals. If you need help with accountability, consider recruiting a a mentor or a leadership coach to guide you.

Break the code. As human beings, we’re inclined to follow certain coded patterns of behavior—and defense mechanisms are among those patterns. But if something isn’t serving you well, it’s possible to break out of the unhealthy pattern and rewire new, more useful patterns and habits.

From my decades of experience as a leadership executive coach, I know that even top leaders around the world sometimes struggle to overcome defense mechanisms and other problem habits. And I know it takes effort and practice to overcome them. But I’ve also seen the results, and I know it’s an effort worth making.

Lead from within: Everyone deals with defense mechanisms. But when you rely on negative patterns of behavior and make excuses when you could be making progress, it’s time to reassess your behavior and make the changes you need to make to become the leader you’re meant to be.

Defense mechanisms—the unconscious reactions that protect us from anxiety and internal conflict—are a part of being human. We all have them. And while they frequently do harm, in some situations they can actually be useful. What matters, in life and in leadership, is what we do about them.

Failing to understand and deal with your defense mechanisms is especially harmful in leadership work, where relationships with others are critically important and you’re setting the standard for the workplace culture of your entire team.

Defense mechanisms work differently for everybody. But whatever form they take, it’s possible to master defensive responses and damaging habits—to harness them in a way that helps you rather than holding you back.

Here are the top ideas I share with my executive leadership coaching clients for overcoming their own defense mechanisms:

Cultivate self-awareness. The necessary first stop is to understand how you use defense mechanisms when you’re feeling vulnerable. Think about what situations tend to trigger defense responses and how you typically respond. Consider the ways that your behavior may be harming you and those around you, and imagine other ways to respond to situations that seem threatening.

Make room for acceptance. When you feel yourself moving toward a defensive response, stop and give yourself a brief time out. Spend a few moments giving space to what you’re thinking and feeling. Identify those thoughts and feelings and work to accept them without judgment. From there you can focus on a healthy response.

Hold yourself accountable. Defense mechanisms are often a way of making excuses or blaming others for things we cannot be responsible for. Remind yourself often that you can’t control anybody else’s actions or responses—but you can control your own. Then spend some time every day reflecting on your own actions and whether they were effective, reasonable, and in line with your values and goals. If you need help with accountability, consider recruiting a a mentor or a leadership coach to guide you.

Break the code. As human beings, we’re inclined to follow certain coded patterns of behavior—and defense mechanisms are among those patterns. But if something isn’t serving you well, it’s possible to break out of the unhealthy pattern and rewire new, more useful patterns and habits.

From my decades of experience as a leadership executive coach, I know that even top leaders around the world sometimes struggle to overcome defense mechanisms and other problem habits. And I know it takes effort and practice to overcome them. But I’ve also seen the results, and I know it’s an effort worth making.

Lead from within: Everyone deals with defense mechanisms. But when you rely on negative patterns of behavior and make excuses when you could be making progress, it’s time to reassess your behavior and make the changes you need to make to become the leader you’re meant to be.

Former Pfizer Exec Believes Leaky Vaccine Was Intentional

Former Pfizer Exec Believes Leaky Vaccine Was Intentional

BY Joseph Mercola TIME July 2, 2022

Bill Gates has stated that COVID-19 was ‘pandemic one,’ and the next one will really get everyone’s attention. For that, this 17-year veteran Pfizer scientist who’s an expert in respiratory pharmacology warns they may launch a therapy similar to a go kart with no accelerator, steering wheel or brakes.

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Michael Yeadon, Ph.D., a former vice-president and chief scientific adviser for the drug company Pfizer, shares why he believes that the narratives around COVID-19 are false and were put into place deliberately to exert control over society
  • Yeadon says you’ve been lied to about the magnitude of the threat represented by this entity called SARS-CoV-2 and the disease COVID-19
  • The 2009 H1N1 (swine flu) pandemic was a “dress rehearsal” for the COVID-19 pandemic
  • The use of the spike protein in the shot was a diabolical mistake, as 90% of the immune response mounted after natural COVID-19 exposure is not to the spike protein
  • Spike protein is also toxic and mutates rapidly, which essentially destroys virtually any protection that the shot provides shortly after it’s given
  • The fact that virtually every country worldwide followed suit in imposing ineffective lockdowns and other COVID-19 mandates suggests a coordinated, supranational effort was underway

Michael Yeadon, Ph.D., a former vice-president and chief scientific adviser for the drug company Pfizer and founder and CEO of the biotech company Ziarco, now owned by Novartis, has become one of the most prominent critics of COVID mandates and COVID-19 shots. In this riveting interview with British radio presenter Maajid Nawaz, he shares why he believes that the narratives around COVID-19 are false and were put into place deliberately to exert control over society.

Yeadon is uniquely positioned to speak on this topic, as he has degrees in biochemistry and toxicology, and studied respiratory pharmacology. You have likely seen Yeadon being interviewed many times previously, but I strongly encourage you to watch this one as he explains items I have never heard him previously discuss. He is one of the sharpest guys out there in this area and you will be glad you took the time to listen.

In the film, he says: “So, I understand … inside of cells and how cells and tissues talk to each other, and how dangerous chemicals can affect and injure humans and others.”1 Not only does Yeadon explain why COVID-19 shots aren’t effective, but he details why using spike protein in the vaccine was one of the most diabolical mistakes made.

“First,” Yeadon says, “you’ve been lied to about the magnitude of the threat represented by this entity called SARS-CoV-2 and the disease COVID-19. Been lied to about that, in every way, shape and form … the bottom line is, we’ve been lied to and it’s deliberate, and they knew it, and no action was needed whatsoever, other than if you’re sick, stay home.”2 Further, the wheel may have been set into motion in 2009, during the swine flu pandemic.

The 2009 Swine Flu Was the Final Dress Rehearsal for COVID

During the 2009 H1N1 (swine flu) pandemic, secret agreements were made between Germany, Great Britain, Italy and France with the pharmaceutical industry before the H1N1 pandemic began, which stated that they would purchase H1N1 flu vaccinations — but only if a pandemic level 6 was declared by the World Health Organization.

Six weeks before the pandemic was declared, no one at WHO was worried about the virus, but the media were nonetheless exaggerating the dangers.3 Then, in the month leading up to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, WHO changed the official definition of pandemic, removing the severity and high mortality criteria and leaving the definition of a pandemic as “a worldwide epidemic of a disease.”4

This switch in definition allowed WHO to declare swine flu a pandemic after only 144 people had died from the infection worldwide. In 2010, Dr. Wolfgang Wodarg, then head of health at the Council of Europe, accused pharmaceutical companies of influencing WHO’s pandemic declaration, calling swine flu a “false pandemic” that was driven by Big Pharma, which cashed in on the health scare.5

Pope Francis saddened by Fourth of July shooting in Chicago

Pope Francis decries a shooting in which six people were killed and over 30 injured at a Fourth of July parade in the northern Chicago suburb of Highland Park.

By Deborah Castellano Lubov

Pope Francis has decried the tragic shootings that killed six and wounded some 30 others during a Fourth of July parade in the Chicago suburb of Highland Park on Monday, appealing for a rejection of all forms of violence, and a respect for life at all its stages.

The Holy Father did so in a telegram sent to the Archbishop of Chicago, Cardinal Blase Cupich. In the telegram, sent on the Pope’s behalf by Vatican Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, he said he was “deeply saddened” to learn “of the senseless shooting” that took place in the US, and asked the Cardinal to convey his spiritual closeness to all affected by this attack.

Appeal to reject violence and respect life

The Pope said he “joins the entire community in praying that Almighty God will grant eternal rest to the dead and healing and consolation to the injured and bereaved.”

“With unwavering faith that the grace of God is able to convert even the hardest of hearts, making it possible to depart from evil and do good,” Pope Francis prayed “that every member of society will reject violence in all of its forms and respect life in all of its stages.”

Pope Francis concluded, by sending his Apostolic Blessing “as a pledge of strength and peace in the Lord.”

US Shootings

On Monday, a gunman on a rooftop opened fire on an Independence Day parade in the affluent northern Chicago suburb killing at least six people and wounding at least 30 others.

Police identified Robert E. Crimo III as a person of interest in the shooting and after an hours-long manhunt, the suspect was taken into police custody.

The July 4 shooting marks the latest tragic shooting in the country, and takes place in the light of hundreds of others during 2022 that have plagued schools, churches, grocery stores and now community parades.